withdrawal

Withdrawal

Let’s face it; any way you look at it detoxing is not an easy thing to do. Whether you’re coming off cigarettes, sugar, alcohol or crack who wants to do go through the intense cravings, the sweaty nights of lying awake, chills or the flu-like symptoms that can make you want to crawl up in a hole and die? I have experienced all of the above and really hope I never have to go through it again.

In the early nineties when I got clean and sober, after having used for years, it took a while for the fog to lift. However, when it finally did, I had a profound realization that was crystal clear, ‘I wanted to help other addicts and alcoholics get clean as well’. After taking a series of required courses I got a job as a counselor in a local detox center at Brotman Hospital.

While working there over the course of five years, I had many clients whose lives had been downsized to a pill, a crack pipe or a bottle of Jack Daniels. Others who laid in the fetal position in their beds, swearing they would never drink again. There were our frequent flyers and some we’d never see again.

We averaged about one death a month and those were just the ones we knew about. Others would simply go MIA and when an addict goes missing, it’s usually not a good thing.

During that time one of the most common questions I was asked was, “what can I expect from my withdrawal?”

Here’s what the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) says about it:

“Withdrawal is the various symptoms that occur after long-term use of a drug is reduced or stopped abruptly. Length of withdrawal and symptoms vary with the type of drug. For example, physical symptoms of heroin withdrawal may include restlessness, muscle and bone pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, and cold flashes. These physical symptoms may last for several days, but the general depression that often accompanies heroin withdrawal may last for weeks. In many cases, withdrawal can be easily treated with medications to ease the symptoms, but treating withdrawal is not the same as treating addiction.”

To take it a step further, one would have to consider the dosage, the length of time they used and the patients overall physical health. While I could give the client very broad strokes, in order for them to get their question answered, they would need to talk to the doctor or the nurse.

But what about all those people who tried the hospital and for whatever reason it didn’t work?

Fortunately, MD Home Detox offers a comprehensive approach that includes a Board Certified addiction specialist, a doctor, in-home nursing care, a counselor, case manager and other clinical professionals who are available 24 hours a day.

“A lot of families, without realizing it, can sabotage the clients recovery,” Jose Hernandez, the founder of MD Home Detox said. “This is either because they don’t know enough about addiction or they are in denial themselves. After working in the field for years, I realized there were addicts who had tried conventional methods only to come home and relapse once again. I wanted to create a safe environment for these individuals, using our clinical team to coach and educate the entire family along the way.”

Jose went on to explain, that the team first goes through the entire home removing all alcohol, drugs and anything that has the potential to trigger the client. With around the clock nurses, an on call doctor, who is in touch with the client via Skype or house calls every day, MD Home Detox offers the only concierge detox of its kind.

Jose explains, “I wanted to provide a confidential setting for celebrities, executives, congressman or people that simply want quality care and privacy who need detox services. This way they don’t have to be worry about being discovered or found out by the media, which allows them the ability to detox in peace.”

Making a decision to get clean is only the first step. Detox can be painful and sometimes even dangerous so it is important to enlist the support of a clinical team that will help in mapping out a personalized plan for detox and recovery.

When the client is stable enough MD Home Detox will often make the recommendation for the individual to continue with residential treatment, intensive outpatient or sober living, which will help them build a foundation for a rewarding and productive life.

Below are two lists of typical withdrawal symptoms when getting off heavy drug use:

Physical symptoms

• Vomiting
• Diarrhea
• Heart palpitations
• Nausea
• Headaches
• Insomnia
• Muscle and bone pain
• Tremors
• Weight loss
• Cold flashes
• Sweating

Psychological symptoms

• Insomnia
• Cravings
• Anxiety
• Irritability
• Paranoia
• Poor concentration
• Social fear
• Depression

Severe symptoms often related to alcohol or tranquilizers

• Hallucinations
• Seizures
• Delirium tremens
• Strokes
• Heart Attacks

http://www.drugabuse.gov/frequently-asked-questions

No Comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.