Fentanyl
Detox

Fentanyl is one of the most powerful opioids out there. It’s up to 100 times stronger than morphine.

Fentanyl is one of the most powerful opioids out there. It’s up to 100 times stronger than morphine. It is incredibly addictive and produces painful withdrawal symptoms when you stop using it. Therefore, fentanyl detox is necessary for anyone who wants to stop using the substance.

What is Fentanyl?

Fentanyl is a man-made opioid. It’s used primarily as a painkiller for moderate or severe pain. The drug is often prescribed to people with cancer pain.

It mimics the effects of naturally derived opioids, such as morphine and codeine. Only a small amount of the substance is necessary to relieve pain. Some fentanyl analogs are even more potent than the pharmaceutical-grade substance. Carfentanil, for example, is 10,000 times more powerful than morphine.

In prescription form, fentanyl typically comes as a lozenge, tablet, spray, injectable formula or transdermal patch. However, many people manipulate those methods of administration to increase the potency or deliberately misuse the product.

Most incidences of fentanyl-related fatalities are associated with illegally made forms of the drug. Other ingredients may be added. These ingredients can intensify the high, but they can also increase the risk of addiction and overdose.

How do you know if you need Fentanyl detox?

It’s easy to become physically dependent on fentanyl. If you don’t use opioids, your body secretes chemicals that naturally reduce pain and make you feel good. These neurotransmitters bind to the opioid receptors in your central nervous system. They help keep your system in balance.

However, they’re not strong enough to relieve intense pain. Also, you can’t overdose on your body’s own chemicals.

Whether you take fentanyl for pain relief or just to get high, it binds to the same opioid receptors that are normally activated by your body’s own chemicals. In doing so, it blocks pain signals.

Because those receptors are triggered by the drug, your body reduces its production of natural feel-good neurotransmitters. It thinks that you don’t need them anymore.

When you stop taking fentanyl, you experience withdrawal symptoms because your body isn’t used to managing its own chemical levels. This is how you become physically dependent on fentanyl. You can become dependent on the substance even if you take a prescription as directed by a doctor.

Eventually, the fentanyl stops working as well as it once did. You might need more of it just to feel normal. Dependency can quickly lead to addiction. The chances of becoming addicted increase if you abuse or misuse the drug.

The only way to bring your body back into balance is to stop using the substance. However, you might be afraid of doing so because you know that you’ll experience fentanyl withdrawal symptoms. That’s when fentanyl detox is necessary.

What does Fentanyl detox entail?

Most people have trouble going through fentanyl detox without support. Approximately 6 to 36 hours after the last dose, they begin to have withdrawal symptoms. Fentanyl withdrawal symptoms can range from moderate to agonizing depending on your history with the drug.

Some of the most common initial withdrawal symptoms include:

• Irritability
• Chills
• Sweating
• Restlessness
• Headache
• Muscle pain
• Cramps

Within another day or two, your symptoms may peak. Other withdrawal symptoms that you can experience at that time are:

• Nausea
• Vomiting
• Confusion
• Diarrhea
• Anxiety
• Insomnia
• Loss of appetite
• Shaking

These symptoms may subside within about 10 days. For some users, protracted withdrawal symptoms continue for weeks or months.

During the fentanyl detox process, you should be medically supervised. Make sure that you have adequate psychological and physical support.

Many people don’t want to have to leave their homes to enter an unfamiliar and uncomfortable rehab facility. When you’re sick, all you want to do is stay in bed. Our home detox program allows you to do that.

We send our professionals to you to provide support, ease your withdrawal symptoms and make sure that you detox safely. We can administer medications to reduce the side effects of fentanyl detox. We also make sure that you get through each phase of fentanyl detox successfully.

Home detox is an ideal option for people who find solace in their own space. You may also be able to get through the fentanyl detox process more quickly when you’re relaxed and at ease. Contact us today to learn more about fentanyl detox at home and find out if our methods are right for you.

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